Search Results: Sowing-and-aftercare

Rhinanthus minor - Yellow Rattle

Yellow rattle is a grassland annual with yellow, two lipped flowers, the upper lip with two white or (as in our photographs) purple teeth. Behind the flower the joined sepals inflate to form a green bladder sometimes tinged with red. Flowering occurs from May through to September followed by a seed capsule which rattles within the now brown and papery bladder. The majority of seed ripens in mid to late July and the rattling of the fruit within the bladder was said to indicate that the meadow was ready to be cut for hay, hence its other common name of hay rattle.

Agrostemma githago - Corncockle

A medium to tall (up to 1m +) annual with long, narrow and softly hairy leaves. The large (up to 3.5cm across) pinky purple flowers are borne singly on a long stem and are surrounded by long pointed sepals. The flowers are followed by a straw coloured flask like seed head containing large (3.5mm) black, rough textured seed.

Alliaria petiolata - Garlic Mustard

Also known as Hedge Garlic and Jack-by-the-hedge. A medium to tall biennial or short-lived perennial with small white, yellow-centred flowers. Flowers occur from April to June and are followed by long green seedpods which shed their seed from July onwards. One of the easiest ways to identify this plant is by it fresh green, heart-shaped leaves that smell of garlic when crushed.

Angelica sylvestris - Wild Angelica

Wild Angelica is a tall, handsome plant. The umbels of tiny white flowers, often tinged with pink, are carried upright on tall (up to 2.5m) downy or hairless stems from June to September, giving a frothy appearance from a distance. The much divided, slightly glossy pinnate leaves add to the open, airy appearance. The flat, oval fruit have thin papery wings to aid their wind-borne dispersal.

Anthriscus sylvestris - Cow Parsley

Also known as Queen Anne’s lace. A common and familiar plant of road verges with a distinctive odour. This tall umbellifer has hollow stems which often become purple with age and fresh green, sharply-cut pinnate leaves. The flowers are white and form open, lacy umbels from April to June, followed by smooth dark seeds.

Arum maculatum - Lords-and-Ladies

The flowers of this strange-looking plant form a purple-brown tubular structure which smells slightly of decay and is shielded by a pale green sheath. The whole structure grows very close to the ground and is surrounded by large, long-stemmed dark-green leaves shaped like arrow heads, often with a scattering of dark spots. The flowers appear during April and May and are followed by clusters of poisonous bright orange-red berries.

Chelidonium majus - Greater Celandine

A medium tall, bushy perennial with greyish pinnate leaves with lobed leaflets. The flowers, which are present from April through to early October, consist of four well separated deep yellow petals. These are followed by a long seed capsule containing a row of shiny black seeds.

Myrrhis odorata - Sweet Cicely

Sweet Cicely is an attractive plant reaching a height of about 90cm and with umbels of white flowers in bloom from spring to early summer. The leaves are light green, fern like and deeply divided but their most distinctive characteristic is that they smell strongly of aniseed when crushed. Sweet Cicely has many common names including Beaked Parsley, Cow Chervil, Fern-Leaved Chervil, Roman Plant, Sweet Fern, and Sweet Cus.

Origanum vulgare - Wild Marjoram

Wild marjoram is a British native perennial growing to about 60cm. The dark purple buds at the top of the stem open to show purple, pink or occasionally white bunches of thyme like flowers. The leaves are long, oval and usually slightly toothed and are sweetly scented. Our native plant is the same species as the Mediterranean herb known as oregano but because it grows in a cooler climate it has a less intense and less earthy smell.

Plantago lanceolata - Ribwort Plantain

A short rosette-forming herb with leathery ribbed leaves sprouting from the base of the plant. In grazed or mown turf, and over winter, the leaves are rounded and flattened to the ground, but in meadows and taller grassland the leaves grow upwards and are elongated in shape (lanceolate). Stubby brown flower heads with whitish anthers are borne on plain unbranched and leafless stalks. Flower stalks are produced throughout the summer.

Trifolium pratense - Wild Red Clover

Sorry - we have now run out of this item. We should have more in the near future. Red clover is the familiar pink or purple-pink flowered perennial clover of grassland and waysides. Its large darkish green trefoil leaves often have a distinct whitish crescent on each leaflet. Native wild forms of red clover (var. pratense), especially those originating from old meadows (like our stocks), are more compact and long lived compared to robust erect agricultural fodder varieties of red clover (var. sativum).

Briza media - Quaking Grass (w)

Quaking grass is one of our most attractive and easily recognised wild grasses on account of its delicate branched head of trembling or ‘quaking’ spikelets which are greenish yellow, often with a sheen and tinged purple. It is a perennial, its plants are tufted with smooth flat slightly greyish green leaves. Its foliage usually remains short at the bottom of a sward, particularly in a mixed or grazed sward. The flowering stems grow up to a height of up to 50cm in June.

Cynosurus cristatus - Crested Dogstail (w)

Crested dogstail is a compact tufted perennial grass. It is a comparatively low grass with a leafy base of flat smooth leaves that fill out at the bottom of a mixed grass sward. Its flowers and seed heads are born up higher (up to 50-75cm) on thin wiry stems which resist grazing so can be found persisting right through to seeding even in short heavily grazed pasture. The heads themselves are quite distinctive, compact and regular in shape.

Avenella flexuosa - (Deschampsia flexuosa) - Wavy Hair-grass (w)

Wavy hair-grass is an attractive, short to medium height, slow growing perennial grass. It has fine needle like rolled leaves which build over time to form a loosely to densely tufted, clump or mat. It produces delicate fine flower heads with wiry flexuous branches in summer.

Schedonorus arundinaceus - (Festuca arundinacea) - Tall Fescue (w)

Tall fescue is a robust tall perennial grass. It has long broad flat stiff leaves which can form large dense tussocks. Its stout flowering stems can reach 2 metres high terminating in branched heads which often nod to one side under the weight of their heads bearing comparatively large seeds. Because of its impressive stature it is sometimes grown as an ornamental garden plant. NB Until recently this flat leaved fescue had the name Festuca arundinacea when it was classified with other finer fescues which have narrow rolled leaves.

Festuca rubra - Red Fescue (w)

Red fescue is a fine-leaved perennial grass of medium height and vigour. Its fine, bristle-like, mid to dark green glossy leaves are probably its most characteristic feature. Its heads are branched typically growing to less than 70cm in height. Red fescue is extremely variable species which can grow in dense tufts or spread out by rhizomes to form patches or carpets of fine leaves. The wild red fescue form we offer was originally collected from unimproved species rich meadow grassland.

Koeleria macrantha - Crested Hair-grass (w)

Crested hair-grass is a compact tufted perennial grass with narrow green to grey-green leaves. Its neat clustered heads are borne up on short stems usually only reaching about 40cm in height. The grass flowers are quite attractive, silvery greenish or purplish in colour and glistening when fresh.

Cynosurus cristatus - Crested Dogstail

Crested dogstail is a compact tufted perennial grass. It is a comparatively low grass with a leafy base of flat smooth leaves that fill out at the bottom of a mixed grass sward. Its flowers and seed heads are born up higher (up to 50-75cm) on thin wiry stems which resist grazing so can be found persisting right through to seeding even in short heavily grazed pasture. The heads themselves are quite distinctive, compact and regular in shape.

Schedonorus arundinaceus (Festuca arundinacea) - Tall Fescue

Tall fescue is a robust tall perennial grass. It has long broad flat stiff leaves which can form large dense tussocks. Its stout flowering stems can reach 2 metres high terminating in branched heads which often nod to one side under the weight of their heads bearing comparatively large seeds. Because of its impressive stature it is sometimes grown as an ornamental garden plant. NB Until recently this flat leaved fescue had the name Festuca arundinacea when it was classified with other finer fescues which have narrow rolled leaves.

Festuca rubra ssp. commutata - Chewing's Fescue

Chewing's fescue is a type of red fescue. It is a fine-leaved perennial grass of medium height and vigour. Its fine, bristle-like, mid to dark green glossy leaves are probably its most characteristic feature. Its heads are branched, typically growing to less than 70cm in height. Red fescue is an extremely variable species which can grow in dense tufts or spread out by rhizomes to form patches or carpets of fine leaves. Chewing’s fescue is a relatively distinct subspecies as it is the only non-creeping form and so cannot spread vegetatively by rhizomes. Instead it grows to forms dense tufts (or mats if mown frequently). The name Chewings is from a Mr Chewing who first traded its seed as lawn seed in large quantities from New Zealand.

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